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Local Medina County News

Medina Hospital unveils 'state-of-the-art ICU'

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    Christina Canfield, a clinical nurse specialist, is pictured on the monitor explaining Medina Hospital’s new eHospital monitoring program that covers 208 beds across nine Cleveland Clinic hospitals in the region.

    HALEE HEIRONIMUS / GAZETTE

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    Cleveland Clinic Medina Hospital President Dr. Richard Shewbridge and board Chair Pam Miller cut a ribbon Tuesday afternoon that signified the grand opening of the intensive care unit following the completion of a $1.7 million renovation. Also pictured, from left, are Donielle Finding, nurse manager; Dr. Nadeem Rahman, ICU director; Medina Mayor Dennis Hanwell and Julie Fetto, chief nursing officer.

    HALEE HEIRONIMUS / GAZETTE

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Christina Canfield, a clinical nurse specialist, is pictured on the monitor explaining Medina Hospital’s new eHospital monitoring program that covers 208 beds across nine Cleveland Clinic hospitals in the region.

HALEE HEIRONIMUS / GAZETTE Enlarge

MEDINA — Cleveland Clinic Medina Hospital unveiled its renovated intensive care unit Tuesday afternoon, a $1.7 million upgrade.

The eight-month project included new flooring, lighting, ceilings, cabinets, television monitors and the installation of the eHospital monitoring program.

Each room has a private bathroom, and two of the 12 rooms have a lift system to transport a patient from bed to restroom.

Work on the approximately 10,000-square-foot space was completed in six phases, with the final phase finished in late August.

Hospital officials said only 25 percent of the unit closed at a time to allow for patient care.

“This is a tremendous upgrade for Medina Hospital,” hospital President Dr. Richard Shewbridge said. “This state-of-the-art ICU provides the best environment for our caregivers to provide care for our most critically ill patients.”

Shewbridge, who has been practicing endocrinology in the Medina area since 1996, was appointed to lead Medina Hospital in July. He succeeded Dr. Thomas Tulisiak, whose resignation took effect May 1.

One of the main highlights of the project was the installation of the eHospital monitoring program, which allows health care providers to monitor patients during overnight hours.

The program is managed in an operation center in Beachwood and is staffed 7 p.m. to 7 a.m., seven days a week by two critical-care nurses and a physician. The staff covers 208 beds across nine Cleveland Clinic hospitals in the region and in Florida.

“The program provides vigilance and availability for physicians and nurses to monitor patients,” said Dr. Nadeem Rahman, unit director for Medina Hospital. “It makes a difference for our staff at night, in terms of fatigue and burnout.”

Health care providers have full access to a patient’s electronic medical records and can perform visual assessments using in-room cameras that are mounted on the ceiling. They also can see the patient’s vital signs, review lab tests and can contact on-duty caregivers if they are concerned about a patient.

Each room also has a television so caregivers, patients and their families can see and hear clinicians in the operations center, with a microphone and an eHospital call button on the wall.

Rahman said Medina Hospital is one of the pilot sites for the monitoring program.

“One of the visions for the clinic is telemedicine,” Rahman said. “Being pioneers of this initiative, we are part of a special organization.

“We can now take care of people within their community instead of transferring them to the main campus, where the wait list is sometimes 10 to 15 (people).”

Another highlight of the project was a $30,000 donation, provided by the Medina Hospital Foundation, for the purchase and installation of two Likorall overhead lift motors.

The lift system allows clinicians to place a patient in a sling and transport him or her them to a private restroom. It also can be used to help the patient walk during recovery.

“It’s so important to move the patient early in the intensive care unit because it provides better health and outcomes for them,” said Donielle Finding, nurse manager. “The system will certainly improve the level of care we can provide for the patient.”

Medina Hospital is one of Medina County’s largest employers with more than 1,000 full- and part-time workers and about 260 physicians on staff. The intensive care unit has about 30 full- and part-time nurses and six rotating physicians.

The hospital also is wrapping up the final construction phase of a

$5.8 million upgrade to its emergency department. Shewbridge said that is scheduled to be completed in January.

Medina Hospital became a Cleveland Clinic affiliate in 2009.

Contact reporter Halee Heironimus at (330) 721-4012 or hheironimus@medina-gazette.com.



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